Pohnpei, FSM

It has been a very, very busy month for us here in beautiful Pohnpei. We arrived in 3 days after leaving rainy Kosrae nearly a month ago.  Our departure was a wild ride coming out of the Kosrae pass; the wind, waves and swell were on our nose. We didn’t have a dry spot left on the entire boat top by the time we motored beyond the tip of the island and turned downwind. Upon clearing the extending reef the wind was in our favor but the waves were big and came at us with a vengeance. Slowly the seas calmed down and we had a decent sail for the next 30 hours. Eventually the wind died, the sails drooped, on came the engine. We motored the rest of the way into Pohnpei.

We arrived at the commercial wharf, completed the quarantine and customs paperwork, and waited for the immigration group. 5 hours later John hailed the Port Control and asked when we should expect immigration to arrive. The conversation between the Port and Immigration was in Pohnpeian but we gathered by the laughter between the parties that somebody screwed up and forgot we were in. 30 minutes later they drove up and the “Superior” asked us why we hadn’t checked in when we first arrived, 5 hours ago.?? Exhausted, and hangry, we just sighed relieved to be in.

At the anchorage we were very pleased to hook up the SV Carina. We started following their blog 5 years ago, stayed in contact with them on facebook and dreamed that one day we might meet them in an anchorage. Dreams do come true! Leslie and Philip have been sailing the South Pacific, across to Indonesia and back, now working their way homeward to Kingston, Washington. For nearly 12 years they have sailed, blogged and are contributors to the Soggy Paws’ South Pacific compendium that hundreds of cruisers from all over the world have come to depend upon. The latest sailing information, customs and immigration requirements, island culture, and all the essential information that cruisers need when arriving in a new country are well documented in “the Compendiums”.

Leslie and Philip gave us a ride into town, showed us the local stops for fresh local veggies and fish, and all the other essentials that we needed. Its been wonderful to hang out with them, hike and enjoy talking about sailing adventures over dinner. Philip is an awesome chef and makes mean gin and tonic drinks. Leslie is funny and a kick to be around.  Really a great couple!

The anchorage has more sailboats than we’ve seen since American Samoa, currently there are eight of us. We’re always excited to meet new yachties, most of the time anyway. The day after arrival we sat in the cockpit having our dinner. Just as we finished a guy from the next boat over paddled along side us. We invited him aboard, the polite thing to do when you’re new in the anchorage, he handed up his full wine glass and dropped into the cockpit.  After about 15 minutes judging from the conversation, I wasn’t sure if I was tired from passage or he was just a little different. He asked about our pasta dinner as he stared at our empty bowls and peered down the companionway; must’ve been thinking that would go nicely with his wine. Having raised and fed seven, always hungry boys we know that look of foraging and drool. “No, we had instant ramen” and received more useless yak about the quality of our food.  Second clue, his glass was empty, he eyed our drinks and said “could I have a drink of what you’re drinking”? My tiny facial hairs tingled, met this kind of cruiser before. Well neither John nor I were willing to share our bottles. Alcohol is a very expensive luxury in the islands, anywhere from $40 to $83 for a bourbon that costs $16 in the States, John dug out the cheap tequila. By the way, Two Buck Chuck wine from Trader Joes in the states is $9/bottle here in Pohnpei !!  Third clue, “do you mind if I step to the back of your boat and have a smoke?” We are not good at being assertive when need be. We were in the cockpit, the back of our small boat is two steps away. Again, we should’ve just said NO. Two smokes later, he stepped to the back again. Thinking “chain smoker”, we instead heard the very distinct sound of water flowing overboard. Thoroughly disgusted, I looked at John, rolled my eyes and said ” we just came off a hard passage and exhausted, we are going below”. We avoided him until he departed two days later, totally relieved! There are strange cruisers just like the weird neighbors at home.

Aside from the strange guy, all other cruisers are great. We’ve enjoyed snorkeling and hiking with Leslie and Philip. We hiked up the Sohkes ridge – the large rock in the background is Sohkes Rock on the ridge —img_1840 with Leslie from Carina, and Jeanine, another cruiser on a Westsail 32 “Fluid Motion”. Jeanine is also from the US, an avid bird watcher and identified all the colorful birds for us. The view was spectacular, img_1716                       the Japanese war relics were a step back in time. The Japanese used the natives to build a long winding road and rock retaining wall along the Sohkes ridge for the gun placements and look outs. There are tunnels and mazes through out the island that were used by the Japanese during the war.  We didn’t venture very far into the tunnels, it seemed a little creepy.  It felt so good to get out and hike, we had a terrific day in the warm rain and sun. Our boat is the middle one on the far right of the anchorage picture.

Another day we took our inflatable kayak and SUP out with another Australian cruiser to the ancient ruins of Nan Madol. img_1789

The stone city was built nearly 2300 years ago. Most of it is overgrown with mangrove trees but the largest site is well preserved. We spent the day paddling through the mangrove canals viewing the ruins. img_1825You can read the entire history with pictures on the internet. Its quite fascinating.   Hundreds of car size stones and hundreds of thousands of columnar basalt from the Sohkes rock were hauled across the island to build the city. The feat is nearly equivalent to the Egyptian pyramids construction.

It hasn’t been all play though. Boat maintenance is about the same as living on land. Clean the garage, clean and polish the stainless steel stove and oven, scrub out mold from damp lockers. img_1842Our headsail that is only 3 years old had some seam threads coming loose. We thought it would be a couple of hours to hand sew, turned out to be several hours and more yet to do. A very big disappointment with the quality of our “Kern” sail. The sun cover stitching along the entire leach line and foot  (side and bottom of the sail), the most exposed area of the sail when furled has rotted away. A job for the industrial sewing machine when we get to Japan and spread out on the dock. There are only a handful of places that sails are actually sewn in the U.S. and very expensive. Most sail lofts contract out with Asian sailmakers, cheaper but the quality is questionable.

John changed out the raw water pump with a new one ordered from the states. The spare we brought turned out to be heavy bronze junk. The teak rubrails and eyebrows need to be refinished, the sun and salt water is so harsh on the wood. Another dock job.

Our visa expires in a week, its time to get moving. We’ve been monitoring the weather for our next passage to Guam. We have to time this arrival perfectly as a US Navy base is in Guam and have a strict entry process. Overtime fees apply to check into the country outside the Mon-Fri, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., average overtime charge is about $265.

Two other boats are leaving bound for Guam and onto Japan also. They are bigger boats with average cruise speed of 7. 5 – 8.0 kts so we probably wont see them until we arrive in Guam but just knowing they’re within a day or so of us is comforting.