Saipan, Very Dear to our Hearts!

Just a quick statement about the  26 hour passage events. It was WET, bouncy, 2 drawers jumped out of their places, two anchors on the bow, 200′ of our anchor chain was still in the chain locker- forgot to pull it down into the bilge and the remaining 50′ slid forward to the forepeak within the bilge. In our hasty departure out of Guam we forgot to batten down the V- berth hatch and hadn’t discovered it until everything was sitting in a large puddle of salt water! We were fully loaded with fuel and water, bikes, SUPs, and lots of provisions. The heavy bow combined with short period 6-8′ very steep waves, close hauled and we were diving with full bowsprit into the water. As we pitched upward the green water gushed down the leeward side where we sat. Sue hailed us about 20 miles into the passage and asked if we wanted to turn back as they also pitched downward and also had water running down into their cockpit. Gushers filled the cockpit, there wasn’t a dry spot left, the port lazarette filled up a couple of times. John hand pumped the water out. We were soaked beyond comfort, Only good thing it was still warm outside. 26 hours later, we entered the calm harbor and tied to the large ferry dock with SV Ouistitis and SV Dionne.
Non potable clean city water and 110 30 amp electricity were free on the dock but no showers or toilets available. $8/ day dock fee, no Harbor or Customs fees. We immediately hosed ourselves, removed the entire contents of the V berth and stacked it on deck. It took nearly 8 days to dry the hosed out cushions, we looked like traveling vagabonds as we slowly repacked the boat.
We left our 45# CQR on the dock, our new friend Moon, took it home. Good riddance to a broken, worthless anchor – email us if you want to know more about that mess.

So onto the part of our wonderful Saipan adventure. We met absolutely, incredibly generous and beautiful friends from all over the world.
Saipan isn’t a cruising destination as most boats heading to Japan stop in Guam to provision and boogie on. For those cruisers who take the time to travel the additional 120 miles northward, the rewards of the people, culture, history and geography is beyond imagination!

The dock is located in the channel so all the tourists from China, Korea and a few Japanese board the ferries outbound to the luscious islands around Saipan where the water is beautiful aqua blue, turquoise green, the diving and snorkeling are pristine and the very fine white coral sand is like powdered sugar.IMG_2114 It was on the dock where we met all our new friends. At the lower left corner you can see two masts, Konami and Dione. Ouistitis is in the middle of the lower half of the picture.

The first set of friends – Mike an American, and his gorgeous Indonesian wife, Nora stopped by and we began talking about boats. Mike has a 40′ TaShing sailboat in Maryland currently undergoing a refit for near future cruising. Nora sailed as crew so has a good background and knowledge. They immediately offered us rides around the island, sites of WWII war and peace memorials, took us to a great breakfast shack. BBQ at their condo poolside, and spent time just hanging out together. Nora drove us where-ever we needed to go, to process our check out papers and last minute fresh food provisioning.

Our next set of friends – Dave, an American Tugboat Captain working between Marshall Isl and who also owns a sailboat in the Saipan harbor, and his lovely Thailand wife Kwaye Pronounced Gale, brought us dinner and offered anything we could possibly need during our stay.

Randy, an American who is First Mate on the Tugboat and his Thailand wife Cindy, ran John and Glenn around town getting fuel, looking for boat parts, had potable water delivered to our boat, brought us Mickey bullet beers, dinner, fresh fruit and all around great conversations.

Nida, our new Phillipina friend is Operations Manager at the Hard Rock Cafe in Saipan brought out the best Nachos for us since Mexico! We enjoyed Nida so much, I hope we meet again in San Francisco where her mother lives. I think we melted our credit card buying T shirts for the grandchildren, and of course a few items for ourselves. Can’t wait to wear my Saipan shirt in the Tokyo cafe!

Ron, an American who owns his software consulting company and his delightful, totally non-stop moving Thailand wife Moon, a former restaurant chef, brought us home cooked meals beyond words. Lemon grass chicken, lime leaf curry with chicken, I wish I could have some now. I have a bag full of dried kefir lime leaves from her tree and a gallon bag full of lemongrass from Gale’s garden. IMG_2128Ron took John and Glenn out to the Forbidden island where they enjoyed cave swimming and around the reef.

Most of our new friends either spend time together or are acquainted.

There were so many other people, mostly strangers that touched our lives and made us feel so at home and generous with fresh fruit and home cooked meals. We had people stopping by the boat at 8:30 a.m. until late afternoon. Between touring around the island, spending time with our new friends, Glenn and Sue, and the French cruisers Eric and Marielle, we were never on the boat long enough to cook anything other than breakfast.

By far, Saipan is the most beautiful island we have visited. The coastline is stunning with shear line cliffs, pristine water, limestone and coral mountains, coconut lined white sand beaches where you can wade out nearly 200′ and still be waist deep in clear warm water. The highways are well maintained, better than the Portland area.
The streets and roadsides are clean despite the abundance of tour buses and thousands of tourists similar to Hawaii. Surprisingly, we didn’t see many American or European tourists, aka Howlies. Perhaps the airline tickets are cost prohibitive? As an American citizen we can sign up for a PO box and become a permanent resident. A 2 bedroom fully furnished condo is roughly $750/month! Food is relatively cheap, and locally grown. Beef is a little expensive as its imported, but beef raised on Rota, a nearby island is high quality and delicious.
We didn’t see a fish market but we weren’t cooking dinners either.

The Carolinians, the original inhabitants and Chomorro natives no longer maintain their national heritage cultures with festivals or community awareness like Guam. Its very unfortunate to lose a culture after the last generation has moved on. We asked about any possibilities of viewing or meeting someone who could give us background information. We did attend first Thursday celebration in the city park. A group of young Carolinian men performed their traditional voyage dance with native costumes. After a few dances volunteers within the audience were asked to come up on stage and give it a try. John and Glenn and a few other men were pulled up and gave their best 20 minute performance. Having danced well in front of a hundred people they were rewarded with a palm frond headpiece that symbolized God’s power and protection for their voyage. We saved John’s headpiece for our boat.
Moon brought her signature lemongrass rice, we purchased a yummy roasted chicken from the Asian food vendor and we all sat on the lawn with our dinner and drinks. A terrific fun and warm evening. Sorry, I don’t have the pictures yet.

The night life comes alive with tourists, great restaurants, clubs, and numerous massage parlors where young Chinese women stand outside their glass front windows with the visible massage chairs inside. Ahem, gotta wonder about some of them. John and Glenn didn’t appear to be too interested with Sue and I standing nearby giving them the stink-eye.

Nora took us snorkeling at the grotto cave. There is no place to leave your shoes or belongings so don’t take anything, you must walk barefoot. The blue water is so clear and colorful – you can see the giant coral bed nearly 30′ below. the ocean water comes in from the cave openings at the oceanside but you can only see intense blue light as you snorkel around the edges of the cave. The stalagmites hang down from the cave ceiling about 15 -25′ above the waterline. The incoming current and waves around the 7′ jump off rock is very intimidating. A lifeguard stands on the giant rock across from the cliffside and gives the signal to jump across the gap. The rope going across the gap is your only lifeline of making it safely across if you jump at the wrong moment. The lifeguard in the water below the rock signals when to jump into the sea. Glenn went first, I nearly slid off the rock rather than jump, I was so afraid but felt compelled to be brave. Nora went in after me, she’s a scuba diver so no fear, John was last. The water surges with such force it pulls you outward from the rock towards the back of the cave where the water comes in 30′ below. Getting out was easy, kick hard back to the giant rock platform and the natural large steps on the side are manageable even with flippers. Getting back to the cliffside rocks are the same current and crashing waves and need to be negotiated carefully. Its free and worth the effort of climbing barefoot back up the long concrete staircase in the cliffside.

Mike and Nora drove us to The Bonzai Cliff over the ocean and Suicide cliff, the memorials were quite moving.IMG_2075IMG_2072 A tremendous amount of lives lost on both sides, civilian women and children were told to jump rather than submit to the “ferocious treatment” by the American Army. Large caves in the face of the limestone mountains and where the large gun shells struck the cliff, the limestone turned white, are still visible. The natural erosion has created a grotesque mask- like face on the mountainside, almost a natural memorial of war horrors.
From the top of Mt. Tapochau, the 360 degree view of Saipan and nearby islands are excellent. The various blue and turquoise colored water, white sand, and cool breeze are beautiful, one could sit for hours and stare out beyond the fields below. There are war remnants left there also, a juxtaposition to all the beauty.

The day before we departed a young Chinese woman asked if we would take her and her mother out to the island for a snorkeling adventure. I explained that our boat was too big and there wasn’t enough water under the keel to get close. I invited them aboard and gave a tour of Konami. They were stunned that we had sailed from the US. And even more stunned that they had the opportunity to see our boat. They were impressed with our gimbaling stove, refrigertor, the amount of food and water,the engine, and the fact that we sailed it with just the two of us aboard. She took lots of pictures with us to prove to her friends that she actually spent time on a sailboat. A “rare experience” as she put it for a Chinese person. They hugged me goodbye and couldn’t thank us enough.

Each day I found myself becoming sadder as time with our new friends came to a close. Saipan is definitely a place to live for a few years. Perhaps the tourists and congestion would get old but there are places to live where its peaceful and beautiful. Stay out of downtown and its perfect.
We hope to meet all of our friends again in Saipan. These experiences of meeting total strangers and sharing a few precious days or just a few moments with the Chinese mother and daughter are so heart warming and fulfilling. We’re so lucky and Grateful for our adventure, for each other, and our supportive families and friends. AND our really awesome Konami!

Wish we could upload all of our really cool pictures, the wifi at McDonalds just isn’t fast enough.

Roundtrip airfare from Japan is reasonable -$418 and even cheaper from China and Korea, about $200, so if you have the opportunity to travel anywhere in Asia, try to include Saipan. You won’t regret it.

Me on my fun folding bike at Suicide Cliff.IMG_2086 The concrete pad in the background was the latrine left over from the Japanese WWII post. Pretty cool to have that left over.

One thought on “Saipan, Very Dear to our Hearts!

  1. Susan Boyle April 12, 2017 / 1:07 pm

    You are living the dream, I am so happy to read your blogs.
    John I am finally retiring very soon , safe travels.

    Like

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